Ealing: Private Microsuction Ear Wax Removal in London W5 (From £50)

ear wax removal London W5 - our microsuction ear wax removal clinic in Ealing W5 provides same day ear wax removal using the safe and effective microsuction method. All of our microsuction ear wax removal practitioners are highly trained, certified professionals registered with either the HCPC or the NMC.

Ealing Microsuction London W5

Ealing - Private Microsuction Ear Wax Removal Clinic In London W5

Our Ealing Microsuction Clinic providing Ear Wax Removal in London W5 can be found:

within Temple Pharmacy
110 Pitshanger Lane
Ealing
London
W5 1QP

You will find us in the Pitthanger Lane shopping area on the same side as the Co-op supermarket. Next door on one side is Navarro Wines and on the other is THC (The Hair Company). 

To help you find the clinic, here's a helpful link: Ealing Microsuction Earwax Removal Clinic on Google Maps.

Appointment Booking

Due to high demand, private ear wax removal is by appointment only. You can go to our ear wax removal online booking calendar, or click the button below. Please have your credit or debit card to hand to confirm your booking.

BOOK NOW! SAVE £5

Or call:  0800 1 337 987

Video: What Happens In An Ear Wax Removal Appointment

Parking

Parking is free in the residential side streets in the Pitshanger area. There is also 30 mins / 1 hour / 2 hours / all day free parking on Pitshanger Lane, depending on the bay - please check the parking signs carefully.

Public Transport

Tube: Nearest tube stations are Ealing Broadway and Hangar Lane. They are both approximately 20 minutes' walk from the clinic.

Buses: The E2, E9 and N7 buses stop on Pitshanger Lane. The nearest stops are Pitshanger Library (Stop SM) and Harrow View (Stop SK) 

Ealing Microsuction Ear Wax Removal In London W5 Location and Directions

You can find our West London Microsuction Clinic in Ealing on Google Maps here.

You can get directions to our West London Microsuction Clinic in Ealing here.

Nearby Clinics

In North West London HA5, we have our Pinner Microsuction Ear Wax Removal Clinic in North West London HA5.

In Central London NW1, we have our Baker Street Microsuction Ear Wax Removal Clinic In Central London NW1.

Visit our booking page to book your West London microsuction ear wax removal appointment, and say goodbye to the discomfort of ear wax.

Our Ealing microsuction ear wax removal clinic also serves clients in Hanwell, Acton, Chiswick, Brentford, Hayes, Greenford, Wembley, White City, Hounslow, Osterley, Twickenham, Putney, Richmond, Earlsfield, Feltham, Southall, West Drayton, Northolt, Olympia, Fulham, Isleworth, Battersea, Hammersmith, Heston, Perivale and Uxbridge.

Ealing Micro Suction Clinic Prices

One or BothPrice
One ear (or wax too impacted / no wax)**£50*
Both ears (or wax too impacted / no wax)**£70*
Upgrade from one to both ears£25*

**Consultation only (no wax present / wax too impacted) If no wax present, will include audiogram and/or ear care advice. If you're not sure both ears are blocked, choose one ear and we will check for you and if both are blocked we will clear both, time permitting and just charge the upgrade fee (excluding out of hours)

Out of hours microsuction appointment Tuesday 5.30pm / 6.00pm (one or both ears / no wax present / wax too impacted)

£80*
* Prices shown include a £5 discount for micro suction appointments booked online. Appointments booked by telephone are £5 more than the prices shown. 36 hours notice required for alterations and cancellations. Thank you. BOOK NOW! SAVE £5

Home Visit Prices

We also perform ear wax removal in your home, care home or nursing home. If you cannot come to us, we will come to you. Due to the additional time and travel costs, the price is higher than a clinic appointment.

Home Visit (one or both ears): £150

Home visit, multiple patients discount

For multiple patients at the same address, we offer a sliding scale discount as less travelling is involved. Please book well in advance.

Number of patientsPrice per patient
2 patients£130 each
3 patients£120 each
4 patients£110 each
5 patients£100 each
6 or more£90 each

Find your nearest clinic:

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About Microsuction

Microsuction is a process of removing ear wax from the ear canal using a medical suction pump, suction wand and either surgical loupes or a special ear endoscope. The ear endoscope is a surgical instrument with fibre optic fibres around the circumference and a solid lens down the middle. The fibre optic fibres carry light into the ear canal, so that the procedure can be viewed by the practitioner on a small screen. Microsuction is by far the most effective method of earwax removal. Tradionally only performed in ENT clinics due to the size and weight of the equipment, it can now be performed by appropriately trained individuals in smaller clinics due to portable suction pumps and visualisation equipment now available. Our network of London Microsuction clinics provides a choices of locations.

How Safe Is Micro Suction?

Micro suction introduces no water into the ear and only removes wax from the ear using gentle suction. The Micro Suction Practitioner uses a pair of operating microscopes known as "loupes" and a bright light to see into your ear canal in great detail. This way, he or she can see exactly what they are doing inside your ear. The suction wands are sterile, so the risk of infection is virtually nil. For these reasons, microsuction is considered the safest method of removing wax from the ear. The process can be quite noisy, up to around 100dB(A). The HSE recommends that to avoid permanent hearing damage, you shouldn't be exposed to continuous levels of noise at 100dB(A) for longer than 15 minutes without hearing protection.

About Ealing

Ealing is the birthplace of the famous Ealing Studios and Ealing Blues Club, and a thriving base for film-makers and musicians. The annual Summer Festival draws large crowds and top performers. Ealing's parks are plentiful, independent shops thrive, and residents are spoilt for choice with top quality restaurants and pubs.

(from https://www.getwestlondon.co.uk/all-about/ealing)

Ealing In Depth

Ealing is a district of west London, England, located 7.9 miles (12.7 km) west of Charing Cross. It is the administrative centre of the London Borough of Ealing, and identified as a major metropolitan centre in the London Plan.
Ealing was historically a rural village in the county of Middlesex and formed an ancient parish. Improvement in communications with London, culminating with the opening of the railway station in 1838, shifted the local economy to market garden supply and eventually to suburban development.
As part of the growth of London in the 20th century, Ealing significantly expanded and increased in population, becoming a municipal borough in 1901 and has formed part of Greater London since 1965. It now forms a significant commercial and retail centre with a developed night time economy. Ealing has the characteristics of both suburban and inner-city developments. Ealing's town centre is often colloquial with Ealing Broadway, the name of both a rail interchange & a shopping centre.
Most of Ealing, including the commercial district, South Ealing, Ealing Common, Montpelier, Pitshanger and most of Hanger Hill fall under the W5 postcode. Areas to the north-west of the town centre such as Argyle Road and West Ealing fall under W13 instead. A small section north-east of the town centre, near Hanger Hill, falls under the NW10 postcode area. The population of Ealing (not including Hanwell and Northfields), comprising the Ealing Broadway, Ealing Common, Cleveland, Walpole and Hanger Hill wards, was 71,492 in the 2011 census. The area of Hanwell is strongly associated with Ealing; however, it is a separate district with its own postcode.

With the exception of driving animals into London on foot, the transport of heavy goods tended be restricted to those times when the non-metalled roads were passable due to dry weather. However, with the passing of the Toll Road Act, this highway was gravelled and so the old Oxford Road became an increasingly busy and important thoroughfare running from east to west through the centre of the parish. This road was later renamed as Uxbridge Road. The well-to-do of London began to see Ealing as a place to escape from the smoke and smells. In 1800 the architect John Soane bought Payton Place and renamed it Pitzhanger Manor, not to live but just for somewhere green and pleasant, where he could entertain his friends and guests. Soon after (1801) the Duke of Kent bought a house at Castlebar. Soon, more affluent Londoners followed but with the intention of taking up a permanent residence which was conveniently close to London. The only British prime minister to be assassinated, Spencer Perceval, made his home at Elm House. Up until that point, Ealing was mostly made up of open countryside and fields where, as in previous centuries, the main occupation was farming.

The most important changes to Ealing occurred in the 19th century. The building of the Great Western Railway in the 1830s, part of which passed through the centre of Ealing, led to the opening of a railway station on the Broadway in 1879, originally called Haven Green. In the next few decades, much of Ealing was rebuilt, predominantly semi-detached housing designed for the rising middle-class. Gas mains were laid and an electricity generating station was built. Better transport links, including horse buses as well as trains, enabled people to more easily travel to work in London. All this, whilst living in what was still considered to be the countryside. Although much of the countryside was rapidly disappearing during this period of rapid expansion, parts of it were preserved as public parks, such as Lammas Park and Ealing Common. Pitzhanger Manor and the extensive 28 acres (110,000 m2) grounds on which it stands, was sold to the council in 1901 by Sir Spencer Walpole, which had been bought by his father the Rt. Hon. Spencer Horatio Walpole and thus became Walpole Park.[7]

It was during the Victorian period that Ealing became a town. This meant that good, well-metalled roads had to be built, and schools and public buildings erected. To protect public health, the newly created Board of Health for Ealing commissioned London's first modern drainage and sewage systems here. Just as importantly, drinking fountains providing wholesome and safe water were erected by public prescription. Ealing Broadway became a major shopping centre. The man responsible for much of all this was Charles Jones, Borough Surveyor from 1863–1913. He directed the planting of the horse chestnut trees on Ealing Common and designed the Town Hall, both the present one and the older structure which is now a bank (on the Mall). He even oversaw the purchase of the Walpole estate grounds and its conversion into a leisure garden for the general public to enjoy and promenade around on Sundays.

(from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ealing)